A Family Feeling And A Professional Approach

Frequently Asked Questions

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Who should I inform of a death?

Immediately following the death, you should notify the next of kin, family doctor (GP), and the Registrar of Births, Marriages, and Deaths. If the deceased was an organ donor, you must act quickly if you are their nearest relative

If the death was expected the doctor will sign the death notification form (which you will need to register the death). If the death occurs suddenly, you also need to contact a member of the Garda Síochána or local police. They will decide if a coroner needs to be called.

Registration of a Death

By law, you must register the death within 3 months. You can do this once you have received the death notification form from the doctor. If a person dies in a hospital or nursing home, the hospital or doctor will give the form to the next-of-kin.

A relative by blood, marriage or civil partnership should register the death. You do not need to be next-of-kin to do this. Registering a death is free and can be done by email or post. Simply complete part 2 of the Death Notification Form and email or post it to any civil registration office, no matter where in Ireland the death occurred.

You will need to include a copy of one of the following valid photo IDs for the person registering the death:

  • passport
  • driver’s license
  • refugee asylum card
  • national ID card from a country where it is an accepted form of travel document
  • public services card
Deaths referred to the coroner
If a death is referred to the coroner, there will be a delay in registering the death.
The coroner will tell you how long this might take. They may give you an interim death certificate. This can be used to close bank and credit union accounts or to cancel social welfare or pension payments.
If the coroner conducts an inquest or post-mortem, they will send a certificate to the civil registration service, who will then register the death. You do not need to do anything else.

Benefits & Entitlements

After a bereavement you may need financial support. The Department of Social Protection provides certain once-off payments to help families during this difficult time. Your local Department of Social Protection’s representative (formerly known as the Community Welfare Officer) deals with some of these payments. You must have made a certain number of PRSI contributions to be eligible for some social welfare payments. You may be eligible for other payments, if you pass a means test or if you are in urgent need. Time limits apply for many payments, so apply as early as is possible. If the deceased was getting a social welfare payment or you were claiming for them as a dependent or you were getting a Carer’s Allowance to look after them, it’s important that you notify the Department of Social Protection within the first few days of the death. Notifying the Department does not mean the payment will be taken back immediately. In many cases, the spouse, civil partner, cohabitant, parent or Carer may continue to receive a payment for six weeks following the death. Citizens information have all the up to date information here.

Where Can I get a Death Certificate?

Contact any local civil register office or the General Register Office to get a copy of a death certificate. When you are registering the death, you can get copies of the death certificate at the same time.

Information you need to provide

To get a death certificate you need to provide:
  • Full name of the deceased
  • Date of death
  • Full address of where the death occurred
  • Former address of deceased
  • Age of deceased when they passed away

Who should I inform of a death?

Immediately following the death, you should also notify the next of kin, family doctor (GP), and the Registrar of Births, Marriages, and Deaths. If the deceased was an organ donor, you must act quickly if you are their nearest relative
If the death was expected the doctor will sign the death notification form (which you will need to register the death). If the death occurs suddenly, you also need to contact a member of the Garda Síochána local police. They will decide if a coroner needs to be called.

What happens if a Death occurs abroad?

When someone dies abroad, particularly if the death was sudden or unexpected, it is often difficult to know how to deal with the practical matters you need to address. Every country has its own rules about the formalities to be followed when someone dies. if the death of an Irish citizen is notified to the Irish embassy or consulate abroad, the Garda Síochána in Ireland are asked to notify any family/next-of kin in Ireland. The embassy/consulate can also help communicate with the police or other authorities abroad.

Why is a Post-mortem held?

CORONER’S POST-MORTEM: The Coroner is an independent official with legal responsibility for the medical-legal investigation of certain deaths including those of a sudden, unexplained, unnatural or violent nature. In some circumstances this enquiry may necessitate a post-mortem examination. If the Coroner directs that a post-mortem examination take place the question of obtaining consent from the next-of-kin does not arise.

CONSENT POST-MORTEM: If a Coroner’s post-mortem examination is not required, the doctors may ask you to agree to a post-mortem examination on your relative. This may help the doctors give you, if you wish, more detailed information about why your relative died.

What is embalming and why is it done?

Embalming is the process of preserving a body to delay the natural break down of cells, which begins when die. It temporarily helps prevent the processes that cause our bodies to decay.

Many people who choose to have a loved one embalmed, do so to spend a little more time with them. The person may be laid out in an open coffin at home, in a church or a funeral home’s chapel of rest.

How much does a funeral cost?

Each Funeral is different, and costs depend on several factors which we are happy to discuss with you.